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Tregothnan

A Grade I Listed Building in St. Michael Penkevil, Cornwall

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.2352 / 50°14'6"N

Longitude: -5.0055 / 5°0'19"W

OS Eastings: 185767

OS Northings: 41571

OS Grid: SW857415

Mapcode National: GBR ZJ.M8DM

Mapcode Global: FRA 08DD.PRR

Entry Name: Tregothnan

Listing Date: 28 February 1952

Last Amended: 27 November 1985

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1141069

English Heritage Legacy ID: 62907

Location: St. Michael Penkevil, Cornwall, TR2

County: Cornwall

Civil Parish: St. Michael Penkevil

Traditional County: Cornwall

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cornwall

Church of England Parish: St Michael Penkevel

Church of England Diocese: Truro

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Listing Text

In the entry for

SW 84 SE ST MICHAEL PENKIVEL

4/69 Tregothnan (formerly
listed as Tregothnan
28.2.52 House)

The whole description shall be amended to read

SW 84 SE ST MICHAEL PENKIVEL TREGOTHNAN PARK

4/69 Tregothnan (formerly
28.2.52 listed as Tregothnan
House)

GV I

Great house. 1650, 1818-18, 1845-8. By William Wilkins (2nd build) for the
fourth Viscount Falmouth and Lewis Vulliamy (3rd build) for the second Earl of
Falmouth. Freestone ashlar of two distinct types, a soft yellow Newham stone
(Truro porphyry) for the earlier work and a fine hard grey limestone (Pentewan
stone) for the later work, lead and slate roofs mostly hidden. A long range
with a central spine corridor in a picturesque Tudor gothic style designed by
Wilkins and extended in like manner by Vulliamy who greatly increased the pic-
turesque effect. Two storeys with three tall towers and with some attics hidden
behind parapets. Many mullioned and transomed windows of one to five lights
with hood moulds. String courses. Battlemented throughout with decorative
panelling. Many tall Tudor terracotta and stone stacks of different designs
adding to an extremely picturesque outline. ENTRANCE (NORTH) FRONT: from left
to right: (a) Bay added by Vulliamy, (b) three bays by Wilkins, the centre one
of which projects as a two storey pointed arch porch and behind this is the four
storey tower containing the staircase, (c) three storey tower with canted bay on
ground floor added by Vulliamy, (d) two bays of Wilkins work, (e) two storey
projecting entrance porch added by Vulliamy, (f) kitchen range connecting
through to the office court (qv). THE EAST FRONT is chiefly Wilkins work with
an addition ((a) above) to the right by Vulliamy. THE GARDEN (SOUTH) FRONT from
left to right: (a) Projecting single bay wing with crow-stepped gable added by
Vulliamy, (b) Five bays with much plainer single and two light windows which
is a reworking of the 1650 house, (c) Irregular eight bay range of Wilkins' work
slightly projecting and with an eight light bay window to right. INTERIOR two
rooms of the 1650 house survive. The common parlour has oak panelling, a chim-
ney piece with caryatids and a geometric and foliated, moulded rib plaster ceil-
ing of similar period but with narrower ribs and more emphasis on floor display.
It has a particularly fine fireplace overmantel with painted panel, drapery
festoons and bolection mouldings. It is not known how altered these rooms may
be from their original appearance. Wilkins' work is mainly in the Greek taste
and of fairly restrained design but good quality workmanship. The ballroom and
drawing room are said to be the finest of these. The stairhall is in the Gothic
mode and would appear to have been influenced by Wyatt's at Ashridge. The
staircase is a cantilevered Imperial with a cast iron balustrade incorporating
trefoils and quatrefoils. The hall is lit by a clerestory with three 3-light
windows on both sides of the tower, and separated from the upper corridors by
Gothic screens. The ceiling is compartmented with elaborate heraldic
decorations. Nothing is known of the vulliamy rooms. The interior was not
accessible at the time of resurvey and the description has been made from
photographs. A full interpretation of the building was not possible and the
extent of the survival of the 1650 house remains uncertain. Both north and
south fronts of the 1650 section were refaced in grey Pentewan stone in the mid
C19 which to some extent continued the original appearance remarked upon by
Celia Fiennes in 1695 'The house is built all of white stone like the rough
coarse marble'. It is also uncertain as to how much of the picturesque deco-
ration of the exterior may be an addition of Vulliamy's for the more romantic
outline he gave to the building. It is reputed that there are many original
drawings and accounts in the house but these are inaccessible. The house is
increased in value by its exceptionally fine natural setting. The 1650 house
was visited and described by Celia Fiennes, cousin of Hugh Boscawen the builder
and it was also the home of Admiral Boscawen in the C18.

Sources: Colvin 2nd ed 1978 pps 859 516 Hussey C Country Life 17 and 24 May
Pevsner BOE 2nd ed 1970 p224 1956
Information from Estate Office

------------------------------------

SW 84 SE ST MICHAEL PENKIVEL TREGOTHNAN PARK

28.2.52 Tregothnan
4/69 (formerly listed as Tregothnan House)

GV I

Great House. 1650, 1816-18, 1845-8. By William Wilkins (2nd build) for the fourth
Viscount Falmouth and Lewis Vulliamy (3rd build) for the second Earl of Falmouth.
Freestone ashlar of two distinct types, a fine hard grey (Truro porphyry) for the
original build and a softer yellow for the later work, lead and slate roofs mostly
hidden. A long range with a central spine corridor in a picturesque Tudor gothic
style designed by Wilkins and extended in like manner by Vulliamy who greatly
increased the picturesque effect. Two storeys with three tall towers and with some
attics hidden behind parapets. Many mullioned and transomed windows of one to five
lights with hood moulds. String courses. Battlemented throughout with decorative
panelling. Many tall Tudor terracotta and stone stacks of different designs adding
to an extremely picturesque outline. Entrance (north) front from left to right: (a)
Bay added by Vulliamy (b) three bays by Wilkins, the centre one of which projects
as a two storey pointed arch porch and behind this is the four storey tower contain-
ing the staircase (c) three storey tower with canted bay on ground floor added by
Vulliamy (d) two bays of Wilkins work (e) two storey projecting entrance porch added
by Vulliamy (f) kitchen range connecting through to the office court (q.v.). The
East front is chiefly Wilkins work with an addition (a above) to the right by
Vulliamy. The Garden (south) front fron left to right:-

(a) Projecting single baywing with crow-stepped gable added by Vulliamy (b) Five
bays with much plainer single and two light windows which is a re-working of the
1650 house (c) Irregular eight bay range of Wilkins' work slightly projecting and
with an eight light bay window to right. Interior two rooms of the 1650 house
survive. The common parlour has oak panelling, a chimney piece with caryatids and a
geometric and foliated, moulded rib plaster ceiling with central pendant, the room
over the common parlour has a ceiling of similar period but with narrower ribs and
more emphasis on floral display. It has a particularly fine fireplace overmantel
with painted panel, drapery festoons and bolection mouldings. It is not known how
altered these rooms may be from their original appearance. Wilkins' work is mainly
in the Greek taste and of fairly restrained design but good quality workmanship.
The ballroom and drawing room are said to be the finest of these. The stairhall is
in the Gothic mode and would appear to have been influenced by Wyatt's at Ashridge.
The staircase is a cantilevered Imperial with a cast iron balustrade incorporating
trefoils and quatrefoils. The hall is lit by a clear storey with three 3 light
windows on both sides of the tower and separated from the upper corridors by Gothic
screens. The ceiling is compartmented with elaborate heraldic decorations. Nothing
is known of the Vulliamy rooms. The interior was not accessible at the time of
resurvey and the description has been made from photographs. A full interpretation
of the building was not possible and the extent of the survival of the 1650 house
remains uncertain. Both north and south fronts of the 1650 section remain faced in
the distinctive white stone (Truro porphyry) remarked upon by Celia Feinnes, and
quite different from the rest of the house, so it may indeed be the original facing
at least in part. It is also uncertain as to-how much of the picturesque decoration
of the exterior may be an addition of Vulliamy's for the more romantic outline he
gave to the building. It is reputed that there are many original drawings and
accounts in the house but these are inaccessible. The house is increased in value by its
exceptionally fine natural setting. The 1650 house was visited and described by
Celia Feinnes, cousin of Hugh Boscawen the builder and it was also the home of
Admiral Boscawen in the C18.


Sources:- Colvin 2nd ed 1978 pps 859 516
Pevsner BOE 2nd ed 1970 p 224
Hussey C Country Life 17 and 24 May 1956.


Listing NGR: SW8576741571

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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