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2- 6 (Even Nos) Bank Street

A Category B Listed Building in Aberfeldy, Perth and Kinross

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Coordinates

Latitude: 56.6192 / 56°37'9"N

Longitude: -3.8665 / 3°51'59"W

OS Eastings: 285563

OS Northings: 749045

OS Grid: NN855490

Mapcode National: GBR JCT7.3LR

Mapcode Global: WH4LQ.LW1H

Entry Name: 2- 6 (Even Nos) Bank Street

Listing Date: 5 August 2002

Category: B

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 396313

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB48837

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Aberfeldy

County: Perth and Kinross

Town: Aberfeldy

Electoral Ward: Highland

Traditional County: Perthshire

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Aberfeldy

Description

E Simpson, Stirling, 1910. 2-storey with raised basement, 6-bay tenement and shops in Flemish renaissance style in irregular terrace to W and on ground falling steeply to N. Red sandstone ashlar and harl with ashlar dressings. Ground floor cornice and frieze, 1st floor cill course, eaves cornice. Pedimented windowheads, fluted pilasters and channelled pilaster strips, stone balustrade, corbels, stone transoms and mullions.

S (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: shop to left of centre with outer granite pilasters, part-glazed timber door with plate glass fanlight to in-canted centre with mosaic-tiled step worded 'McKerchar & McNaughton', and timber-panelled soffit; flanking fixed display windows, that to left bipartite. 2 transomed tripartites to 1st floor each with pediment and moulded frieze with relief carved cartouche, that to left with 'AD' and that to right with '1910'; steeply-pitched M-gable above with decoratively-corbelled moulded shaft extending into cornice with crown- and ball-finialled gablehead, outer angles finialled. Bays to right of centre with larger (but similarly-detailed) shop at ground with modern in-canted door; 3 bays to 1st floor left with transomed bipartites, dividing and flanking channelled pilasters and surmounting stone balustrade, bay to outer right with transomed tripartite as above but with stepped keystone; gablehead also as above but lacking finial.

E (MONESS BURN) ELEVATION: gabled red sandstone bay to left with full-height 4-light canted window to each floor, that to raised basement with blank outer angles, that to ground transomed, and that to 1st floor with crenellation and semicircular-pediment, semicircular gablehead with elaborate monogrammed panel and flanking ball-finials. Set-back gabled bay angled to outer right with tall window to ground and 2 smaller windows above, re-entrant angle to centre with canted bay, tall window to 1st floor, deep eaves course and finialled polygonal roof, these 2 bays harled and all windows corniced.

N (REAR) ELEVATION: 4 bays to right with deep raised basement with variety of openings, ground and 1st floors with tripartite window to each bay, and further bay to outer left with opening at raised basement and stair windows above.

12-pane upper over plate glass lower sashes to canted windows at E, plate glass glazing elsewhere, all in timber sash and case windows. Grey slates and terracotta ridge tiles. Coped ashlar stacks with cans. Ashlar-coped skews with flat skewputts and stone finials. Cast-iron downpipes with decorative rainwater hoppers.

INTERIOR: former McKerchar & McNaughton shop retaining fine interior with boarded timber walls and decorative plasterwork, T-plan top-lit staircase with decorative timber balusters and finialled, square newels. Adjacent shop (No 2) modern.

Statement of Interest

McKerchar & McNaughton also owned the nearby meal mill, now Aberfeldy Water Mill.

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