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Nash Manor

A Grade I Listed Building in Llandow, Vale of Glamorgan

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.4458 / 51°26'45"N

Longitude: -3.4945 / 3°29'40"W

OS Eastings: 296238

OS Northings: 172932

OS Grid: SS962729

Mapcode National: GBR HH.N5QS

Mapcode Global: VH5HS.CXZH

Entry Name: Nash Manor

Listing Date: 16 December 1952

Last Amended: 26 October 1995

Grade: I

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 13138

Building Class: Domestic

Location: Set in its own grounds to N of Llandow trading estate and 1km S of Llysworney. The entrance to the drive is at the junction of the B4268 and the B4270.

County: Vale of Glamorgan

Community: Llandow (Lland┼Á)

Community: Llandow

Locality: Nash

Traditional County: Glamorgan

Find accommodation in
Cowbridge

History

A multi-period country house which has longstanding associations with the Carne family who were important in Glamorgan for many generations. Sir Edward Carne (c.1500-61) was also a nationally important lawyer and diplomat who served Henry VIII, Mary and Elizabeth. Links by marriage were made with the Mansel, Stradling and Nicholl families. Nash Manor passed out of the family in 1951 and has now been divided into two properties.

The structure dates back to the early C16, this part comprises the E/W aligned hall which forms the core of the present house. Later C16 and early C17 enlargement to the E including the parlour and further later C17 work. Modifications were made in the early C18 before remodelling was carried out by Reverend John Carne c1789. C19 changes (eg re-windowing) and rebuilding of the W wing followed and finally modern restoration. Nash Manor therefore illustrates the development of a manor house through five centuries, whilst retaining its C16/ C17 structure. It is described at length by the RCAHM (Wales) in the Inventory of Glamorgan.

Exterior

Two-storey and attic with rendered elevations. Largely built of local limestone but brick to later W wing; sandstone window dressings and slate roofs - formerly stone tiled. Tudor hoodmoulds to all windows, mostly small-pane, timber frame and sashes but some courtyard windows have sunk-chamfered stone mullions. In its present form Nash Manor is of H-shaped plan with an enclosed courtyard to the N. The C17 house would however, have been T-shaped with a hall block and parlour cross-wing.

The house is approached from the N side where the courtyard is entered through a gatehouse/ clocktower, probably added c1789; this has the Carne emblem over the clockface and the timber bellcote retains its bell; timber-gated, seats within and chamber above. Gable ends of E and W wings either side with decorative bargeboards. In the courtyard is a coat of arms over the main doorway; one blocked three-light transomed window, together with adjacent mullioned windows, indicates the form of fenestration before C19 alterations. The E front is distinctive for its fine group of lateral chimney breasts including one to the gable end of the central block where the chimney is corbelled out at first floor level and a pair of chimneys at S end. Windows have scalloped timber heads. Similar window detail to the stepped S side which has four gables with decorative bargeboards, finials and an added porch. Gateways and terraced forecourt have ball finials.

Interior

The finest room in the house today is the Parlour, at the S end of the E wing. Its ceiling is of six bays with two added narrow bays at the N end and the beams are richly moulded to the highest standards of the day. The room is fully panelled with bolection moulded muntins and has pulvinated frieze with dentilled cornice; the frieze is principally decorated with strapwork style scrolls linked beneath a cabled border and the cornice has a continuous band of semicircular floral splays. Some of the wall panelling on the N wall has been reset. The fireplace and overmantel are flanked by Ionic pilasters (similar to those on the N wall) and the overmantel has four arcaded panels divided by garlanded male and female figures with foliated spandrels; the dressed stone chimney piece is C19 with blue and white tiles within. The overmantel, which displays an early use of classical motifs, represents one of the most remarkable achievements in panelling in Glamorgan and is comparable to that at St. Fagans Castle and Llanmihangel Place. The other main ground floor room is the hall but this has been redecorated in the C19 and includes an inscribed stone chimneypiece inserted by Revd. Nicholl. To the S of this is 'the little parlour' which has the remains of C18 panelling. N of the parlour in the E wing is the kitchen which has beamed ceiling with broad chamfers and ovolo stops. Beyond that is the room that may correspond to the 'new chamber' included in the 1628 inventory; similarly beamed ceiling and a grand overmantel made up of re-used pieces of C17 carving; the window at the N end has one pane engraved "Dec. 10th 1889 J D Carne". In the W wing there is one grand room at the S end with pilastered chimneypiece. The main openwell, staircase lies to the rear of the hall block and is basically late C16 although has been partly reconstructed (see lower newel and dog-gate of the lower flight);in its original form it would have been wholly exceptional. Nevertheless it has unusual octagonal newels, richly ornamented in strapwork, together with ball shaped finials that are hollowed-out rather in the manner of a crown; turned balusters. At the top of the stair at first floor level are two dressed stone Tudor-arched doorways with 'hour-glass' stops, one retains its original door. Beamed ceilings to main first floor rooms. In the E wing one end room retains complete bolection moulded panelling with large raised fields. In the attic much of the original, partly mortice and tenon jointed, roof structure is retained but with collars cut out to N end on E wing.

Reasons for Listing

Listed grade I for its exceptional interest as one of Glamorgan's finest country houses retaining sub-medieval internal detail of the highest quality.

Recommended Books

Other nearby listed buildings

  • II Pheasant House at Nash Manor
    Nash Manor is set in its own grounds to the N of the Llandow trading estate and 1km S of Llysworney. The entrance to the drive is at the junction of the B4268 and B4270.
  • II PIgeon Hose at Nash Manor
    The Pigeon House is immediately beside the roadside boundary wall to the W of the main house; linked to the Pheasant House by a courtyard wall.
  • II The Rectory
    Located on the N side of the lane leading E to the B4268 from Llandow.
  • II Milepost at the Carne Arms PH
    Located on the roadside and set into the end of the S boundary wall of the Carne Arms public house at Llysworney.
  • II Breach Farm House
    About 1.8km W of Llanblethian, and 300m S of road.
  • II Great House
    At the centre of the village to S of Parish Church, set behind a low rubble wall.
  • II Former Ebenezer Particular Baptist Chapel
    Llandow
  • II Former Church School
    Prominently located at the centre of Llysworney village to the S of the parish church, set back from the road within a small paved yard surrounded by a low rubble wall.

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