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Churchyard Walls and Gate Piers to St Mary's Abbey Church

A Grade II Listed Building in Margam, Neath Port Talbot

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.5629 / 51°33'46"N

Longitude: -3.731 / 3°43'51"W

OS Eastings: 280110

OS Northings: 186307

OS Grid: SS801863

Mapcode National: GBR H6.DL8P

Mapcode Global: VH5H2.8ZY9

Entry Name: Churchyard Walls and Gate Piers to St Mary's Abbey Church

Listing Date: 24 February 1975

Last Amended: 25 April 2000

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 14161

Building Class: Religious, Ritual and Funerary

Location: Enclosure walls to a large, roughly rectangular churchyard to the N of the abbey church. It projects round to the W and incorporates the entrance gates.

County: Neath Port Talbot

Town: Port Talbot

Community: Margam

Community: Margam

Traditional County: Glamorgan

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History

The gate piers are contemporary with the church restoration of 1805-10 as they are in the same style as the church. The flanking churchyard walls are older, although they must post-date the dissolution of the monasteries and the purchase of the estate by Sir Rice Mansel c1540.

Exterior

A pair of ashlar gate piers of cruciform section supporting capped upstands on decorated corbels with further projecting band beneath. Between the piers are ornate double cast iron gates. The top rails curve up towards the centre to fleur-de-lis finials, and consist of a frieze of scroll-work. Bands of linked ovals bound the uprights which have arched heads with ornate pendant finials. Scroll-work to lock bar. Low dog rails consisting of tall pointed finials within curved motifs. Stylised crosses in bottom angles.

The flanking churchyard walls are of rubble stone of irregular height. Saddleback coping survives in some areas, rendered in places. Remains of former openings in N wall, now blocked. A late C20 entrance with round arch is immediately N of the Stones Museum, beyond which is a small lean-to.

Reasons for Listing

Listed for the unusual gate piers, similar to the church turrets, and for the extensive churchyard walls which impart character to this important group.
Group value with abbey church, stones museum and war memorial.

Recommended Books

Other nearby listed buildings

  • II War Memorial
    Located immediately outside and to the R of the entrance gates to St Mary's Abbey Church and churchyard.
  • I Ivy Cottage including Facade of Former Banqueting House
    Located along the N boundary of the gardens, N of the Orangery and SE of the kitchen gardens. The facade faces W into the park, whilst the cottage is outside the park boundary.
  • II Almshouses
    Located on the S side of the lane which leads off the A48 to St Mary's Abbey Church. The almshouses are opposite the churchyard entrance.
  • I St Mary's Abbey Church
    Located at the end of a short lane which runs NE off the A48. The Stones Museum is within the churchyard. The S doorway faces into Margam Park.
  • II Stones Museum
    Within the churchyard and adjoining the W boundary wall near the NW corner.
  • I Margam Orangery
    The centre-piece in the gardens at Margam Park. The abbey remains are immediately to the NE, with the broadwalk leading up to Margam Castle further E.
  • II Kitchen Garden Walls including Vinery Glasshouse
    The kitchen garden wall forms the N boundary of the gardens and flanks the lane leading to the abbey. A wall at right angles runs S to the Vinery Glasshouse.
  • II* Terrace with Pools and Flower Beds Fronting Margam Orangery
    Immediately in front of and adjoining Margam Orangery.

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